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Averaging Time-Lapse Imagery

Lately I’ve been creating some long-term time-lapse stills and animations out of photos I’ve taken with an ordinary handheld camera.  In this post, I’ll explain what I’ve been doing to try to get decent-looking results.  I’ll also share a Photoshop script I cobbled together to automate much of the process, which would otherwise be prohibitively…

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Averaging Faces in Profile, and Other Things

Face averaging has now become a relatively common procedure, with an assortment of software programs specifically designed to carry it out.  But all past efforts I’ve seen have had one significant limitation: they assume faces will be shown looking forward, and they can’t accommodate faces shown in full profile.  That’s frustrating if we want to…

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My Fiftieth Griffonage-Dot-Com Blog Post

This blog made its debut just under two and a half years ago, and since then I’ve published a new post every two and a half weeks on average, bringing the total—if we include this one—to fifty.  That’s a nice milestone to have reached, and it gives me a good excuse to reflect on what’s…

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Averaged Portraits of U. S. Presidents, 1789-1829

To celebrate the Fourth of July this year, I’d like to share a set of portraits I’ve made of the first six presidents of the United States by applying face-averaging software to groups of contemporaneous paintings of them—portraits that are arguably both new and authentic at the same time, as paradoxical as that might seem. …

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Listen to an Electric Fish from the 1870s!

It’s only a couple seconds long, but this is still an exciting snippet of historical audio, both audibly and conceptually.  You’ll find it at the end of this blog post, and if you’re feeling impatient, you can always scroll down and listen to it right now.  But as for what exactly it is—well, that’s going…

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The First Phonautograph in America (1859)

In 1859, a wealthy Philadelphia merchant named Charles N. Bancker bought a phonautograph for his lavish private collection of scientific apparatus.  It may have been the first phonautograph ever sold, and perhaps even the first one professionally built.  In 1871, Professor Henry Morton bought it from Bancker’s estate in turn—together with a collection of phonautograms—on…