Moon Phase Animations (AD 650-1650)

The phenakistoscope was the first known animation device to rely on rapidly displayed image sequences, and it dates back only to the first half of the nineteenth century.  However, some much older pictures exist of successive moon phases arranged into circles, and these closely resemble phenakistoscope discs in format and logic.  I recently had the…

Animating Historical Photographs With Image Morphing

There’s always room for improvement, as they say.  In February 2014, I posted my first entry on this blog, “Historical Stereoviews as Tweened Animated GIFs,” demonstrating a method of creating animated GIFs from stereoviews that aren’t as headache-inducing as the common “wiggle GIF.”  You might recognize our alligator friend from that post—it was my first-ever…

Face Averaging and Art History

Earlier this month, I blogged about face averaging as a historical technique: combining face averaging software with a time base to illustrate patterns of change over time.  Since then, I’ve tried some further experiments applying the principle not to particular groups of people as I did last time—Indiana University students, United States Senators, Miss America…

Face Averaging as a Historical Technique

News media were recently abuzz with reports of a study in which the “average” faces of women from forty-one different countries had just been discovered by combining and averaging large numbers of real individual photos.  In fact, it wasn’t so simple: as the Huffington Post observes, this work had actually been done a couple years…