Time-Based Image Averaging

Imagine watching a time-lapse video covering more than a century that shows the evolution of a landscape, a magazine cover, trends in fashion, or automobile design.  Or picture the same thing being done with the face of a politician or celebrity from youth to old age, or with artistic trends in painting spanning a millennium…

Eye Reflections as Accidental Stereoviews

The eyes, it’s said, are the mirror of the soul.  But they also serve as mirrors more literally: we can see things reflected in them.  And when we’re looking at two eyes side by side, we can often see the same things reflected in both at once, from slightly different vantage points—nature’s own stereoviews!  With…

More Tintype Animations

It’s been several months since I’ve published any new tintype animations here at Griffonage-Dot-Com, but I’ve continued to create them from time to time, and I think I’ve finally accumulated enough to warrant another blog post.  I don’t have any novel technical breakthroughs to share this time around—all the methods I used have already been…

Moon Phase Animations (AD 650-1650)

The phenakistoscope was the first known animation device to rely on rapidly displayed image sequences, and it dates back only to the first half of the nineteenth century.  However, some much older pictures exist of successive moon phases arranged into circles, and these closely resemble phenakistoscope discs in format and logic.  I recently had the…

Animating Historical Photographs With Image Morphing

There’s always room for improvement, as they say.  In February 2014, I posted my first entry on this blog, “Historical Stereoviews as Tweened Animated GIFs,” demonstrating a method of creating animated GIFs from stereoviews that aren’t as headache-inducing as the common “wiggle GIF.”  You might recognize our alligator friend from that post—it was my first-ever…

Face Averaging and Art History

Earlier this month, I blogged about face averaging as a historical technique: combining face averaging software with a time base to illustrate patterns of change over time.  Since then, I’ve tried some further experiments applying the principle not to particular groups of people as I did last time—Indiana University students, United States Senators, Miss America…